an exercise in miscellany

Archive for the ‘money’ Category

Invisible Hand

In money, words & phrases on August 6, 2011 at 7:40 am

In economics, the invisible hand, also known as invisible hand of the market, is the term economists use to describe the self-regulating nature of the marketplace. This is a metaphor first coined by the economist Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments, and used a total of three times in his writings. For Smith, the invisible hand was created by the conjunction of the forces of self-interest, competition, and supply and demand, which he noted as being capable of allocating resources in society. This is the founding justification for the Austrian laissez-faire economic philosophy

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Fibonacci numbers

In money, technology & innovatons on April 22, 2011 at 12:54 pm

In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers are the numbers in the following integer sequence: 0,\;1,\;1,\;2,\;3,\;5,\;8,\;13,\;21,\;34,\;55,\;89,\;144,\; \ldots\;
The Fibonacci sequence is named after Leonardo of Pisa, who was known as Fibonacci. Fibonacci’s 1202 book Liber Abaci introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics, although the sequence had been described earlier in Indian mathematics.
Fibonacci numbers are used in the analysis of financial markets, in strategies such as Fibonacci retracement, and are used in computer algorithms such as the Fibonacci search technique and the Fibonacci heap data structure. The simple recursion of Fibonacci numbers has also inspired a family of recursive graphs called Fibonacci cubes for interconnecting parallel and distributed systems. They also appear in biological settings,such as branching in trees, arrangement of leaves on a stem, the fruit spouts of a pineapple,the flowering of artichoke, an uncurling fern and the arrangement of a pine cone.

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Hindenburg Omen

In money on December 27, 2010 at 11:31 am

The Hindenburg Omen is a technical analysis pattern that is said to portend a stock market crash. It is named after the Hindenburg disaster of May 6, 1937, during which the German Zeppelin Hindenburg was destroyed.  The Omen is largely based on Norman G. Fosback’s High Low Logic Index (HLLI).  The value of the HLLI is the lesser of the NYSE new highs or new lows divided by the number of NYSE issues traded, smoothed by an appropriate exponential moving average.

via Hindenburg Omen – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.