an exercise in miscellany

Archive for the ‘art’ Category

2011 in review

In art on January 3, 2014 at 12:42 pm

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,600 times in 2011. If it were a cable car, it would take about 60 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

2012 in review

In art on January 3, 2014 at 12:41 pm

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 5,600 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 9 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

2013 in review

In art on January 3, 2014 at 12:41 pm

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,100 times in 2013. If it were a cable car, it would take about 35 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Conceit

In art, history, words & phrases on February 15, 2013 at 9:56 am

aristotle2In literature, a conceit is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a conceit invites the reader into a more sophisticated understanding of an object of comparison. Extended conceits in English are part of the poetic idiom of Mannerism, during the later sixteenth and early seventeenth century.

via Conceit

Found Art

In art on December 4, 2012 at 9:55 pm

found artThe term found art—more commonly found object or ready-made—describes art created from undisguised, but often modified, objects that are not normally considered art, often because they already have a non-art function. Marcel Duchamp was the originator of this in the early 20th century.Found art derives its identity as art from the designation placed upon it by the artist. The context into which it is placed (e.g. a gallery or museum) is usually also a highly relevant factor. The idea of dignifying commonplace objects in this way was originally a shocking challenge to the accepted distinction between what was considered art as opposed to not art. Although it may now be accepted in the art world as a viable practice, it continues to arouse questioning, as with the Tate Gallery’s Turner Prize exhibition of Tracey Emin’s My Bed, which consisted literally of her unmade and disheveled bed. In this sense the artist gives the audience time and a stage to contemplate an object. Appreciation of found art in this way can prompt philosophical reflection in the observer.

via Found art

Paranoiac-Critical Method

In art on June 2, 2012 at 6:36 am

The paranoiac-critical method is a surrealist technique developed by Salvador Dalí in the early 1930s. He employed it in the production of paintings and other artworks, especially those that involved optical illusionsand other multiple images.

The Surrealists related theories of psychology to the idea of creativity and the production of art. In the mid-1930s André Breton wrote about a “fundamental crisis of the object”. The object began being thought of not as a fixed external object but also as an extension of our subjective self. One of the types of objects manifested in Surrealism was the phantom object.

According to Dalí, these objects have a minimum of mechanical meaning, but when viewed the mind evokes phantom images which are the result of unconscious acts.

The paranoiac-critical arose from similar Surrealistic experiments with psychology and the creation of images such as Max Ernst’s frottage technique, which involved rubbing pencil or chalk on paper over a textured surface and interpreting the phantom images visible in the texture on the paper.

 

via Paranoiac-critical method

Ivan Bilibin

In art, history on February 1, 2012 at 9:15 am

Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin (1876 – 1942) was a 20th-century illustrator and stage designer who took part in the Mir iskusstva and contributed to the Ballets Russes. Throughout his career, he was inspired by Slavic folklore.Bilibin gained renown in 1899, when he released his illustrations of Russian fairy tales.

via Ivan Bilibin

Andres Serrano

In art, wild card on February 1, 2012 at 8:58 am

Andres Serrano (born August 15, 1950 in New York City) is an American photographer and artist who has become notorious through his photos of corpses and his use of feces and bodily fluids in his work, notably his controversial work “Piss Christ“, a red-tinged photograph of a crucifix submerged in a glass container of what was purported to be the artist’s own urine.

via Andres Serrano

The Garden of Earthly Delights

In art on December 13, 2011 at 9:23 am

The Garden of Earthly Delights is a triptych painted by the early Netherlandish master Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450–1516), housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid since 1939. Dating from between 1490 and 1510, when Bosch was about 40 or 50 years old, it is his best-known and most ambitious work. It reveals the artist at the height of his powers; in no other painting does he achieve such complexity of meaning or such vivid imagery

via The Garden of Earthly Delights

Mark Ryden

In art on December 13, 2011 at 9:18 am

Ryden’s work has been featured in lowbrow art publications such as Juxtapoz, Hi Fructose, and BLAB!.

Ryden has designed album covers for musicians including Michael Jackson, Ringo Starr, Jeff Beck, Oingo Boingo, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Screaming Trees, Scarling, and Jack Off Jill, and collaborated with composers Stan Ridgway (Wall of Voodoo) and Pietra Wexstun for Music for his 2003 “Blood” show.

Ryden is also a subject of “The Art Army” hand-made action figures by Michael Leavitt.

via Mark Ryden